Our paper on the first X-ray diffraction tomography experiment of real-life size micro-tubular SOFC has been published in Nature

Figure various micro-monolithic anode supports after sintering

Various micro-monolithic anode supports after sintering at 1450 °C. SEM images of central-axis-view of: a 3, b 4, and c 7 channels; Cross-sectional images of d sponge between the shell and two channels in the 7-channel anode, e sponge between the central channel and surrounding two channels in the 7-channel anode; f close-up image of anode/electrolyte interface

Our new work on a state-of-the-art SOFC has been published in a paper Design of next-generation ceramic fuel cells and real-time characterization with synchrotron X-ray diffraction computed tomography in Nature Communications.

Ceramic fuel cells offer a clean and efficient means of producing electricity through a variety of fuels. However, miniaturization of cell dimensions for portable device application remains a challenge, as volumetric power densities generated by readily-available planar/tubular ceramic cells are limited. Here, we demonstrate a concept of ‘micro-monolithic’ ceramic cell design. The mechanical robustness and structural integrity of this design is thoroughly investigated with real-time, synchrotron X-ray diffraction computed tomography, suggesting excellent thermal cycling stability. The successful miniaturization results in an exceptional power density of 1.27 W cm−2 at 800 °C, which is among the highest reported. This holistic design incorporates both mechanical integrity and electrochemical performance, leading to mechanical property enhancement and representing an important step toward commercial development of portable ceramic devices with high volumetric power (>10 W cm−3), fast thermal cycling and marked mechanical reliability.

The synchrotron experiments were conceived, designed and performed by Dr Antony Vamvakeros and Dorota Matras in collaboration with a team from the Electrochemical Innovation Lab (EIL) from UCL Chemical Engineering using ESRF’s ID15A beamline using a state-of-the-art SOFC designed by Imperial College.

Read the full article at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-09427-z

Read more about it at http://www.esrf.eu/sites/www/home/news/general/content-news/general/real-time-characterisation-of-a-new-miniature-honeycomb-fuel-cell-shows-its-outstanding-properties.html